Loss of Bladder Control Women

The material provided below is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to replace the diagnosis or treatment by a qualified healthcare professional. You should always seek medical advice before consuming any new medicines or supplements.

What Causes Occasional Bladder Control Issues?

Reasons behind occasional bladder control issues

Take a look below at a few of the most common bladder control issues. And remember, this doesn’t make you abnormal. In fact, occasional bladder control issues are quite common.

  • Frequent urge to urinate.
  • Sudden urges to go to the bathroom.
  • Waking up in the middle of the night to go.

If you’re experiencing these issues, AZO Bladder Control® with Go-Less® and AZO Bladder Control® & Weight Management include safe and drug-free ingredients to help you take control of your bladder.*

UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES OF BLADDER CONTROL ISSUES

Truth is, occasional bladder control issues can happen almost anytime. During a meeting, at an event, while taking a walk outside, even just a sudden sneeze. And the reality is, there are lots of reasons why you could be having occasional bladder control issues and a frequent urge to urinate.

You may be under the impression that bladder control issues affect only older women. That’s not the case. Although natural aging can be a factor, things like pregnancy and menopause are all reasons for bladder control issues. Even weight gain can be a factor that contributes to the issue, causing urgency even when the bladder isn’t yet full.

The urgency to urinate is caused by nerve signals telling you that your bladder needs to be emptied whether it is full or not. This causes your bladder muscles to contract, sending you running for the bathroom. When the muscles and tissue that help support bladder control become weak (which can happen with aging or menopause) you may feel a sensation of increased urge to go. While these are common reasons for occasional bladder control issues, it’s always a good idea to talk with your healthcare professional to make sure nothing more serious is going on.