Learning Center

You Are Not Alone

Don’t Let Occasional Bladder Control Issues Make You Feel Isolated!

You Are Not Alone

The material provided below is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to replace the diagnosis or treatment by a qualified healthcare professional. You should always seek medical advice before consuming any new medicines or supplements. AZO products referenced on this website are not intended to treat, cure, or prevent any disease such as overactive bladder, urinary tract infections, or vaginal infections.

It’s a secret that many people have, but most don’t like to discuss. Occasional bladder leakage is one of the most common, yet least talked about, issues among many people, but particularly women as they age. So, right here and now, let’s break the silence—and the stigma—of occasional bladder control issues.

What Constitutes a Bladder Control “Issue?”

A sudden and immediate need to urinate, occasional bladder leakage as a result of physical stressors (like coughing or sneezing), repeated instances of day and night-time urges to urinate1—these are all issues which can impede a person’s daily routine, and their ability to enjoy every day social interactions or even to simply get a full night’s sleep.2 Occasional symptoms can occur individually or together and can range from aggravating to downright embarrassing. 

So, I’m Not the Only One?

Hardly! 40% of women reportedly experience occasional bladder leakage.2 Any activity that puts strain on the pelvic floor muscle can lead to occasional bladder leakage—including coughing, sneezing, walking, stretching, lifting, laughing and even sex. Women are more prone to occasional light leakage and the chances naturally increase with age.2 So, you are far from the only one!

What Can I Do About It?

Every muscle needs exercise, particularly as we age. Kegel exercises and other bladder training exercises are good for conditioning the muscles of your pelvic floor. This is especially helpful when dealing with the occasional bladder leakage from coughing or sneezing.3 

Don’t limit your fluid intake. Proper hydration is important for healthy bladder and kidney function. Instead, limit your intake of bladder irritating foods and drinks, such as caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods and sugar, which can increase the urge to urinate. Try to maintain a low-fat, high-fiber diet: a common cause of occasional bladder leakage can be constipation or excess weight.1 Consult your doctor to discuss those concerns and any prescribed medications, to see if they can have any affect on bladder function. 

Consider adding AZO Bladder Control® with Go-Less® to your daily routine. AZO Bladder Control® with Go-Less® is a drug-free blend made with pumpkin seed and soy germ extracts which help support pelvic muscle strength.* 

Take Back Control of Your Life

Don’t let occasional bladder leakage keep you tethered to a restroom. Now you’ve got the info—the next step is making a plan to take control of your bladder health.
 

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/pelvic-floor

https://www.edocamerica.com/health-tips/bladder-gender-differences-problems-peeing/

https://www.healthline.com/health/bladder-control#pelvic-floor-muscles

Education
Spotlight

View all