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Myth or Fact: Urinary Health

Myth or Fact: Urinary Health

The material provided below is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to replace the diagnosis or treatment by a qualified healthcare professional. You should always seek medical advice before consuming any new medicines or supplements. AZO products referenced on this website are not intended to treat, cure, or prevent any disease such as overactive bladder, urinary tract infections, or vaginal infections.

Urinary health can be a confusing topic as a lot of misleading information exists out there. You’ve probably heard a handful of home remedies on how to cure a UTI, when in fact the only way to treat a UTI is under the guidance of your doctor. The difference between fact and fiction can be the difference between a healthy lifestyle and a potentially life-threatening condition. We’re here to help you filter out the facts and myths of urinary health.

Your Urinary Tract Health Matters

Just like rumors, infections can travel fast. Especially for women. Left untreated, urinary tract infections can cause serious health complications. As an infection grows, so can the symptoms. What starts as an inconvenient burning sensation and the urge to frequently go to the bathroom can lead to blood in your urine, fever, chills, nausea or vomiting, accompanied by lower abdomen or back pain. Having a good understanding is the key to making the right decisions for your urinary health.

Fact Vs. Fiction: UTIs

  1. The Myth: A urinary tract infection (UTI) is always the result of poor hygiene.
    • The Fact: Poor hygiene is only one possible cause of a UTI. There are many factors that can contribute to a UTI, including but not limited to: sexual activity, dehydration, holding it when you need to pee and even certain types of birth control.1 Still, maintaining good hygiene is helpful in providing urinary tract support.
  2. The Myth: Only women get UTIs.
    • The Fact: UTIs can actually happen to both men and women. About 12 percent of men get them, and they can be dangerous.2 However, women get them far more often primarily because of basic anatomy: a woman’s urethral opening is closer to the anus. Also, women have shorter urethras than men, meaning a quicker trip for harmful bacteria to travel and cause an infection.3
  3. The Myth: Drinking cranberry juice can cure a UTI.
    • The Fact: The only way to cure a UTI is to go to your doctor for prescription antibiotics, so if you start feeling that burning sensation, make an appointment ASAP!

1 8 Most Common Causes of UTIs http://www.prevention.com/health/8-most-common-causes-of-utis

2 Male Urinary Tract Infectionshttp://www.pacificcoasturology.com/male-urinary-tract-infections/

3 Urinary Tract Infection http://urology.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=478&ref=11&action=detail

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